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Thousands of Jaguar and Land Rover owners join Leigh Day’s legal claim over defective diesel exhaust filters

More than 3,000 owners of Jaguar and Land Rover diesel vehicles have joined a legal claim by law firm Leigh Day against the manufacturer, dealerships and car finance companies, claiming their cars were fitted with defective exhaust filters.

Posted on 27 March 2024

Leigh Day will allege that at least six Jaguar Land Rover models were fitted with defective Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) systems between 2015 and 2022, impacting their safety and performance and causing them to emit more pollution.

It is claimed that affected vehicles may have to be serviced more frequently and at a higher cost, leading to engine damage and in some cases requiring a new engine. Leigh Day’s research suggests vehicles with defective DPF systems are also likely to have a lower re-sale value.

The DPF system is designed to trap small particles of soot from the vehicle’s exhaust fumes, burning off the particles when the engine is running at high temperatures. It is claimed the defective DPF systems fitted to certain Jaguar Land Rover vehicles can fail to properly burn off the soot, resulting in the exhaust system becoming clogged. This leads to decreased engine performance, which can affect how the car drives, and increased pollution, meaning it is less likely to meet advertised environmental standards.

The law firm Leigh Day is now launching a group legal claim on behalf of people who leased or owned Jaguar Land Rover diesel vehicles between 2015 and 2022. The claims could be worth thousands of pounds in compensation depending on the price paid for the vehicle, any additional servicing or repair costs and any depreciation in the vehicle’s value.

The Jaguar Land Rover models included in the claim are:

  • Land Rover Discovery (L462)
  • Land Rover Discovery Sport (L550)
  • Land Rover Velar (L560)
  • Range Rover (L405) 
  • Range Rover Sport (L494) 
  • Range Rover Evoque (L538 and L551) 
  • Jaguar E-Pace (X450)
  • Jaguar F-Pace (X761)
  • Jaguar XE (X760)
  • Jaguar XF (X260)

Leigh Day partner Oliver Holland said:

“Our investigations are showing that that a significant number of Jaguar Land Rover’s flagship vehicles were apparently fitted with defective Diesel Particulate Filter systems, affecting their safety, performance and impact on the environment. Owners of these high-end expensive vehicles  are having to pay for expensive repairs and the resale value of their cars could also be affected. Our clients are calling on Jaguar Land Rover to compensate them for the trouble this has caused them and the impact on their safety and finances.”

To be eligible for the claim, affected vehicles must have been leased or purchased between January 2015 and 2022, apart from the Jaguar E-Pace X450 which must have been purchased between April 2015 and 2021. If you have owned or leased one of these vehicles, you can find out more about Leigh Day’s potential claim here.

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Oliver Holland
Corporate accountability Diesel emissions claims Group claims Modern slavery

Oliver Holland

Oliver specialises in international cases involving multinational corporations where environmental harm or human rights abuses have been alleged

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