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Charlotte Armstrong

Solicitor

Charlotte Armstrong is a solicitor in the international department.

Corporate accountability

Charlotte is a solicitor assisting Richard Meeran in the international department.

Charlotte undertook her training contract at the firm from 2016 to 2018. Prior to joining Leigh Day, Charlotte graduated from the University of Manchester with a First Class degree in English Literature. She then went on to complete her GDL and LPC at the University of Law in Leeds, obtaining a Distinction in both of these courses. Following her undergraduate degree, Charlotte spent time working for a human rights organisation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

Legal expertise

Charlotte has worked on the following cases:

  • Andre Bravo v Amerisur Resources Plc. A claim on behalf of 270 members of remote communities living in southern Colombia in Putumayo, near the Ecuadorian border. The Claimants allege that over the past 10 years their local waterways have become contaminated with oil and residues from Amerisur’s operations and are no longer safe to use. In January 2020, Leigh Day successfully obtained an interim freezing injunction which required Amerisur to preserve £3million of its UK assets, the purpose being to ensure that the claims and legal costs can be met if the Claimants succeed in an environmental damages legal claim.
  • Kabwe & Others v Anglo American South Africa Limited. A class action lawsuit filed on behalf of a class estimated to comprise more than 100,000 individuals in the Kabwe District of Zambia who are believed to have been poisoned by lead. The application is brought by 13 representative plaintiffs on behalf of children under 18, and girls and women who have been or may become pregnant in the future. The lawsuit is against Anglo American South Africa Limited, a subsidiary of London-headquartered multinational mining company Anglo American Plc.
  • Antuzis & others v DJ Houghton Catching Services & others. A modern-slavery claim on behalf of 16 Lithuanians who were put to work in terrible conditions by a British company, catching chickens at farms all over the country. In February 2019, a landmark judgment regarding the liability of company directors for breaches of contract was handed down in the Claimants’ favour. The judgment has wider significance for all officers of companies, given that it highlights that they may be personally liable to pay damages if they cause their company to operate in breach of contractual and regulatory requirements, particularly if such breaches seriously harm the reputation or financial viability of their company.