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Union keen to highlight drivers' rights following Addison Lee victory

The union which supported a group of drivers in their successful claim for workers’ rights against Addison Lee has urged other drivers to make sure their rights are enforced and has pledged to support those who wish to make a claim against Addison Lee.

13 October 2017

The drivers who brought their claims against Addison Lee in the Employment Tribunal in July 2017 were all members of the GMB union and were represented by law firm Leigh Day.

The judgment of the employment tribunal was handed down last month and ruled that the group of Addison Lee drivers were not self-employed contractors, as Addison Lee alleged, but workers who were entitled to essential workers’ rights including the right to be paid the National Minimum Wage, receive holiday pay and not have their contracts terminated because of being members of a Trade Union.

Following this victory GMB has this week launched a campaign to get this message out to drivers and is circulating a leaflet highlighting drivers’ rights: “the significance of this decision is that it does not take away any of the flexibility that drivers have…the Judgment says nothing about Addison Lee having more control over drivers’ working patterns or hours.”

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GMB is urging drivers to enforce the rights to which they are entitled and, importantly, will support their members to do so through the Employment Tribunal if necessary.

Liana Wood, the solicitor from the Employment department at Leigh Day who brought the successful tribunal claims said: “September’s judgment affects all Addison Lee drivers. The decision is an important step for drivers to achieve workers’ rights, and we encourage all drivers to come forward. GMB’s support should help enable them to do this”.

If you are interested in joining the claim or would like further information, please fill in our contact form and one of our team will get in touch.

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