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Hundreds come forward after FBI abuse appeal

Hundreds of people, including many potential victims, have come forward following FBI appeal

William Vahey killed himself two days after investigators filed a warrant to search a computer drive

15 May 2014

The FBI has revealed that hundreds of people, including many potential victims, have come forward following an appeal they made regarding the actions of a predatory pedophile.

American William Vahey, 64, who taught history and geography at Southbank International School from 2009 to last year was found dead last month from an apparent suicide.

The FBI revealed it has been "contacted by several hundred individuals from around the globe wishing either to reach out as potential victims or provide information in the ongoing investigation".

American national William Vahey, 64, who was found dead two days after police in the US filed a warrant to search a computer drive belonging to him containing pornographic images of at least 90 boys aged from 12 to 14, who appeared to be drugged and unconscious.

They were catalogued with dates and locations that corresponded with overnight field trips that Vahey had taken with students.

The boys in the images were believed to have been students of Vahey's, going back to 2008, and that he had sexually abused all of them.

Vahey, who was jailed for child sex offences in California in 1969, taught in international schools, which has led investigators to believe that he could have victims across the globe and some may not know that they had been abused.

The FBI is leading the investigation into Vahey, with help from the Metropolitan Police.

Alison Millar from law firm Leigh Day's Abuse team, said: "Whilst we await the outcome of this investigation we do call on all schools, especially independent schools, to ensure that suspicions of child abuse are passed on and that their safeguarding policies make clear that they will do this and notify the Designated Officer rather than try to deal with it in-house."

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