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British military interrogators may be charged as war criminals

British military interrogators may be charged as war criminals

Photo of Iraq: istock

10 November 2010

The High Court heard yesterday that three soldiers may face war crime charges under the International Criminal Court Act 2001 (ICCA) for their ill treatment of Iraqi civilians.  Three soldiers have been referred to the Director of Service Prosecution (DSP), following an investigation, for consideration of whether they had breached the ICCA and committed other offences under the Armed Forces Act 2006.

Leigh Day & Co represents those victims who are seeking compensation for the ill treatment they suffered, including those individuals featured in the widely publicised interrogation videos at the heart these recent developments.  During their detention the victims were subjected to the banned “five techniques” which included hooding, placing them in stress positions, exposing them to white noise and depriving them of food and sleep.

Leigh Day & Co currently represents over 250 Iraqi civilians who allege that they have suffered (i) unlawful arrests (ii) brutal assaults (iii) torture whilst in detention and (iv) prolonged and unlawful detention at the hands of the British Forces.

The now infamous death of Baha Mousa, the Iraqi hotel receptionist who was tortured to death by the British troops in Basra in September 2003, has become the best known example of British torture in Iraq but it is fast becoming clear that such abuse was in fact widespread throughout the country.  Leigh Day & Co represented the Baha Mousa family in order to obtain compensation for his children who have been left without a parent.  In 2006, one British soldier pleaded guilty to a war crime charge arising out of his mistreatment of Baha Mousa.

For more information on please contact Sapna Malik or Gene Matthews 020 7650 1200.

Information was correct at time of publishing. See terms and conditions for further details.


Information was correct at time of publishing. See terms and conditions for further details.

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